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Figure 2: Effect of extracranial hyperemia on cerebral oximetry with relatively low separation between emitter and detector. In image (a), the detected signals are from both extracranial and intracranial tissue. In image (b), due to scalp hyperemia, the detected signals are from the scalp only. (Note: The red line indicates extracranial passage while the blue line indicates intracranial passage)

Figure 2: Effect of extracranial hyperemia on cerebral oximetry with relatively low separation between emitter and detector. In image (a), the detected signals are from both extracranial and intracranial tissue. In image (b), due to scalp hyperemia, the detected signals are from the scalp only. (Note: The red line indicates extracranial passage while the blue line indicates intracranial passage)