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Figure 5: Continuous-wave (CW) Doppler recordings of peak velocity across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) (cross: 4.5 m/s) (left) and peak velocity of mitral regurgitation signal (arrow: 6.3 m/s) (right). The concave-to-the-left contour of the Doppler CW jet causes a decrease in the LVOT orifice size as systole progresses and as the mitral valve is pushed further into the septum. Identification of this contour can be useful to differentiate high CW jets of dynamic LVOT obstruction from mitral regurgitation and from valvular aortic stenosis (reprinted with permission from Nagueh et al.[10] from Elsevier Inc.)

Figure 5: Continuous-wave (CW) Doppler recordings of peak velocity across the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) (cross: 4.5 m/s) (left) and peak velocity of mitral regurgitation signal (arrow: 6.3 m/s) (right). The concave-to-the-left contour of the Doppler CW jet causes a decrease in the LVOT orifice size as systole progresses and as the mitral valve is pushed further into the septum. Identification of this contour can be useful to differentiate high CW jets of dynamic LVOT obstruction from mitral regurgitation and from valvular aortic stenosis (reprinted with permission from Nagueh <i>et al</i>.<sup>[10]</sup> from Elsevier Inc.)