Year : 2009  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17--0

Changes in near infrared spectroscopy during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest


Joseph D Tobias1, Pierantonio Russo2, JoAnne Russo3 
1 Department of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
2 Department of Pediatrics and Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA
3 Department of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA

Correspondence Address:
Joseph D Tobias
Department of Anesthesiology Chief, Division of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Russell and Mary Shelden Chair in Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine. Professor of Anesthesiology and Child Health, University of Missouri, Department of Anesthesiology, 3W40H, One Hospital Drive, Columbia, Missouri - 652 12
USA

Monitoring cerebral oxygenation with near infrared spectroscopy may identify periods of cerebral desaturation and thereby the patients at risk for perioperative neurocognitive issues. Data regarding the performance of near infrared spectroscopy monitoring during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest are limited. The current study presents data regarding use of a commercially available near infrared spectroscopy monitor during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in paediatric patients undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease. The cohort included 8 patients, 2 weeks to 6 months of age, who required deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for repair of congenital heart disease. The baseline cerebral oxygenation was 63 11% and increased to 88 7% after 15 min of cooling to a nasopharyngeal temperature of 17-18C on cardiopulmonary bypass. In 5 of 8 patients, the cerebral oxygenation value had achieved its peak value (either ≥90% or no change during the last 2-3 min of cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass). In the remaining 3 patients, additional time on cardiopulmonary bypass was required to achieve a maximum cerebral oxygenation value. The duration of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest varied from 36 to 61 min (43.4 8 min). After the onset of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, there was an incremental decrease in cerebral oxygenation to a low value of 53 11%. The greatest decrease occurred during the initial 5 min of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (9 3%). Over the entire period of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, there was an average decrease in the cerebral oxygenation value of 0.9% per min (range of 0.5 to 1.6% decline per minute). During cardiopulmonary bypass, cooling and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, near infrared spectroscopy monitoring followed the clinically expected parameters. Such monitoring may be useful to identify patients who have not achieved the highest possible cerebral oxygenation value despite 15 min of cooling on cardiopulmonary bypass. Future studies are needed to define the cerebral oxygenation value at which neurological damage occurs and if interventions to correct the decreased cerebral oxygenation will improve perioperative outcomes.


How to cite this article:
Tobias JD, Russo P, Russo J. Changes in near infrared spectroscopy during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.Ann Card Anaesth 2009;12:17-0


How to cite this URL:
Tobias JD, Russo P, Russo J. Changes in near infrared spectroscopy during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Ann Card Anaesth [serial online] 2009 [cited 2021 May 14 ];12:17-0
Available from: https://www.annals.in/article.asp?issn=0971-9784;year=2009;volume=12;issue=1;spage=17;epage=0;aulast=Tobias;type=0