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Noninvasive continuous arterial pressure monitoring during anesthesia induction in patients undergoing cardiac surgery


Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Paul Frank
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover
Germany
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_120_20

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Year : 2021  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 281-287

 

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Objective: In this study we compared noninvasive arterial pressure measurement using ClearSight™ vascular-unloading-technique (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) with invasive arterial pressure measurement during induction of anesthesia undergoing mayor cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective, monocentric. Setting: University hospital. Participants: 54 patients undergoing mayor cardiac surgery. Interventions: During induction all patients were simultaneously monitored with invasive (reference method) and noninvasive arterial pressure measurement (test-method) over a mean time period of 27 minutes. Measurements and Main Results: We observed slightly lower systolic and mean arterial pressures noninvasive than invasive. For systolic arterial pressure the mean of the differences was -18,05 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD ±16,78 mmHg), the mean arterial pressure MAP -5,47 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD ±11,08 mmHg) and for diastolic pressure -1,09 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD±11,15 mmHg),. The mean of the differences in heartrate was 1,15 (p < 0,05, SD±6,9 mmHg). When considering all measured values of the invasively measured MAP and the ClearSight ™ -MAP at the same timestamp over the recording interval, an almost identical progress can be seen that indicates a sufficient mapping of the hemodynamic changes. The percentage error for mean arterial, systolic and diastolic pressure measured by ClearSight™ amounts to 25,95 %, 26,77 % and 34,16 %, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that ClearSight ™ is a good option for hemodynamic monitoring during induction of anesthesia. Taking into account the limitations, non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurement offers sufficient security to safely initiate anesthesia, especially when MAP is of particular interest. The use of non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurement with ClearSight ™ during induction of anesthesia in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery is reliable and easy to use.






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Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany

Correspondence Address:
Paul Frank
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, D-30625 Hannover
Germany
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_120_20

Rights and Permissions

Objective: In this study we compared noninvasive arterial pressure measurement using ClearSight™ vascular-unloading-technique (Edwards Lifesciences Corp, Irvine, CA) with invasive arterial pressure measurement during induction of anesthesia undergoing mayor cardiac surgery. Design: Prospective, monocentric. Setting: University hospital. Participants: 54 patients undergoing mayor cardiac surgery. Interventions: During induction all patients were simultaneously monitored with invasive (reference method) and noninvasive arterial pressure measurement (test-method) over a mean time period of 27 minutes. Measurements and Main Results: We observed slightly lower systolic and mean arterial pressures noninvasive than invasive. For systolic arterial pressure the mean of the differences was -18,05 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD ±16,78 mmHg), the mean arterial pressure MAP -5,47 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD ±11,08 mmHg) and for diastolic pressure -1,09 mmHg (p < 0,05, SD±11,15 mmHg),. The mean of the differences in heartrate was 1,15 (p < 0,05, SD±6,9 mmHg). When considering all measured values of the invasively measured MAP and the ClearSight ™ -MAP at the same timestamp over the recording interval, an almost identical progress can be seen that indicates a sufficient mapping of the hemodynamic changes. The percentage error for mean arterial, systolic and diastolic pressure measured by ClearSight™ amounts to 25,95 %, 26,77 % and 34,16 %, respectively. Conclusions: We conclude that ClearSight ™ is a good option for hemodynamic monitoring during induction of anesthesia. Taking into account the limitations, non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurement offers sufficient security to safely initiate anesthesia, especially when MAP is of particular interest. The use of non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurement with ClearSight ™ during induction of anesthesia in patients scheduled for major cardiac surgery is reliable and easy to use.






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