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Comparative study of intranasal dexmedetomidine v/s midazolam for sedation of pediatric patients during transthoracic echocardiography


1 Department of Cardiac Anesthesia, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Research, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Jigisha Pujara
Department of Cardiac Anesthesia, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad- 380016, Gujarat
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_17_20

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Year : 2021  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 224-229

 

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Background: Procedural sedation required to improve the quality of Transthoracic Echocardiography (TTE) in infants and children. The ideal drug and route for sedation in children should have a rapid and reliable onset, atraumatic, palatable with minimal side effects, and rapid recovery. So, the aim of our study to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of intranasal midazolam and intranasal dexmedetomidine in pediatric patients for sedation during TTE. Materials and Method: Hundred children under three year of age, belonging to the American Society of Anaesthesiologists class-I and II, scheduled for TTE were divided into two groups by standard randomization technique. Patients in group-M received intranasal midazolam 0.2 mg/kg, whereas patients in group-D received intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 μg/kg prior to TTE under an adequately monitored anesthesia care. Onset and duration of sedation, heart rate, oxygen saturation, sonographer's, and parent's satisfaction scores were recorded. Results: All patients were successfully sedated for TTE. The average onset time, sedation time, awakening time and total time for Group-M were 7.3, 18.8, 29.51, 51 min and group-D were 10.1, 14.2, 24.9, 46.3 min, respectively and all were statistically significant (P < 0.001). TTE scan time of Group-M is 8.84 min and Group-D is 9.18 min and was statistically significant. Sonographer's and Parent's average satisfaction score for Group-M was 9.88, 10 and for Group-D was 7.64, 8.76, respectively, which were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam and dexmedetomidine are safe and effective for sedation in TTE. Intranasal midazolam was found to be comparatively more effective in view of onset of action, sonographers, and parental satisfaction score, while sedation time, awakening time and total duration was significantly higher as compared to intranasal dexmedetomidine.






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1 Department of Cardiac Anesthesia, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
2 Department of Research, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Correspondence Address:
Jigisha Pujara
Department of Cardiac Anesthesia, U.N. Mehta Institute of Cardiology and Research Center, Civil Hospital Campus, Asarwa, Ahmedabad- 380016, Gujarat
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_17_20

Rights and Permissions

Background: Procedural sedation required to improve the quality of Transthoracic Echocardiography (TTE) in infants and children. The ideal drug and route for sedation in children should have a rapid and reliable onset, atraumatic, palatable with minimal side effects, and rapid recovery. So, the aim of our study to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of intranasal midazolam and intranasal dexmedetomidine in pediatric patients for sedation during TTE. Materials and Method: Hundred children under three year of age, belonging to the American Society of Anaesthesiologists class-I and II, scheduled for TTE were divided into two groups by standard randomization technique. Patients in group-M received intranasal midazolam 0.2 mg/kg, whereas patients in group-D received intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 μg/kg prior to TTE under an adequately monitored anesthesia care. Onset and duration of sedation, heart rate, oxygen saturation, sonographer's, and parent's satisfaction scores were recorded. Results: All patients were successfully sedated for TTE. The average onset time, sedation time, awakening time and total time for Group-M were 7.3, 18.8, 29.51, 51 min and group-D were 10.1, 14.2, 24.9, 46.3 min, respectively and all were statistically significant (P < 0.001). TTE scan time of Group-M is 8.84 min and Group-D is 9.18 min and was statistically significant. Sonographer's and Parent's average satisfaction score for Group-M was 9.88, 10 and for Group-D was 7.64, 8.76, respectively, which were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam and dexmedetomidine are safe and effective for sedation in TTE. Intranasal midazolam was found to be comparatively more effective in view of onset of action, sonographers, and parental satisfaction score, while sedation time, awakening time and total duration was significantly higher as compared to intranasal dexmedetomidine.






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