Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed191    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded27    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Effect of dexmedetomidine on pulmonary artery pressure in children with congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Narayana Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Narayana Health City, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland
3 Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Narayana Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Narayana Health City, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Correspondence Address:
Muralidhar Kanchi
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospitals, #258/A, Bommasandra Industrial Area, Anekal Taluk, Bengaluru - 560 099, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_115_19

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2020  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 465-470

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (871 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Background: This study was undertaken to determine the effects of dexmedetomidine on pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) undergoing cardiac catheterization with and without a planned intervention during monitored anesthetic care using midazolam and ketamine. Materials and Methods: Children (<18 years) with known CHD and PH who were scheduled for cardiac catheterization and interventional procedures were included in the study. The procedures were performed under monitored anesthesia. After obtaining baseline PAPs, an intravenous (IV) infusion of dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) was given for over 10 min. During infusion, heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate (RR), and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2) were recorded every 2 min until completion of dexmedetomidine infusion, 15 min later, and when the procedure was completed. In addition, pulmonary artery systolic and diastolic pressures, and mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) were recorded and the pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP)/systolic blood pressure (BP) ratio was calculated. Results: All children tolerated the procedure without adverse events. The HR decreased significantly over time during dexmedetomidine infusion. The changes in systemic systolic BP and PAPs were not significantly different from the baseline value at all points of measurement as was the ratio between the systolic pulmonary artery and systolic systemic BPs. Conclusions: Administration of dexmedetomidine in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min did not significantly alter the PAP in children with CHD and PH. There was a decrease in the HR that was not clinically significant. The children tolerated dexmedetomidine without adverse events.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Narayana Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Narayana Health City, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland
3 Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Narayana Institute of Cardiac Sciences, Narayana Health City, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Paediatric Anaesthesia, University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, USA

Correspondence Address:
Muralidhar Kanchi
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospitals, #258/A, Bommasandra Industrial Area, Anekal Taluk, Bengaluru - 560 099, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_115_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: This study was undertaken to determine the effects of dexmedetomidine on pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) and pulmonary hypertension (PH) undergoing cardiac catheterization with and without a planned intervention during monitored anesthetic care using midazolam and ketamine. Materials and Methods: Children (<18 years) with known CHD and PH who were scheduled for cardiac catheterization and interventional procedures were included in the study. The procedures were performed under monitored anesthesia. After obtaining baseline PAPs, an intravenous (IV) infusion of dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) was given for over 10 min. During infusion, heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate (RR), and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2) were recorded every 2 min until completion of dexmedetomidine infusion, 15 min later, and when the procedure was completed. In addition, pulmonary artery systolic and diastolic pressures, and mean pulmonary artery pressure (MPAP) were recorded and the pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP)/systolic blood pressure (BP) ratio was calculated. Results: All children tolerated the procedure without adverse events. The HR decreased significantly over time during dexmedetomidine infusion. The changes in systemic systolic BP and PAPs were not significantly different from the baseline value at all points of measurement as was the ratio between the systolic pulmonary artery and systolic systemic BPs. Conclusions: Administration of dexmedetomidine in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min did not significantly alter the PAP in children with CHD and PH. There was a decrease in the HR that was not clinically significant. The children tolerated dexmedetomidine without adverse events.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article