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Efficacy of bilateral pectoralis nerve block for ultrafast tracking and postoperative pain management in cardiac surgery


1 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Cardiaothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
P S Nagaraja
Department of Cardiac Anaesthesia, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru - 560 069, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_15_18

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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 333-338

 

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Background: Good postoperative analgesia in cardiac surgical patients helps in early recovery and ambulation. An alternative to parenteral, paravertebral, and thoracic epidural analgesia can be pectoralis nerve (Pecs) block, which is novel, less invasive regional analgesic technique. Aims: We hypothesized that Pecs block would provide superior postoperative analgesia for patients undergoing cardiac surgery through midline sternotomy compared to parenteral analgesia. Materials and Methods: Forty adult patients between the age groups of 25 and 65 years undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting or valve surgeries through midline sternotomy under general anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups with 20 in each group. Group 1 patients did not receive Pecs block, whereas Group 2 patients received bilateral Pecs block postoperatively. Patients were extubated once they fulfilled extubation criteria. Ventilator duration was recorded. Patients were interrogated for pain by visual analog scale (VAS) scoring at rest and cough. Inspiratory flow rate was assessed using incentive spirometry. Results: Pecs group patients required lesser duration of ventilator support (P < 0.0001) in comparison to control group. Pain scores at rest and cough were significantly low in Pecs group at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 h from extubation (P < 0.05). At 24 h, VAS scores were comparable between two groups. Peak inspiratory flow rates were higher in Pecs group as compared to control group at 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h (P < 0.05). Thirty-four episodes of rescue analgesia were given in control group, whereas in Pecs group, there were only four episodes of rescue analgesia. Conclusion: Pecs block is technically simple and effective technique and can be used as part of multimodal analgesia in postoperative cardiac surgical patients for better patient comfort and outcome.






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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE - JANAK MEHTA AWARD
 




1 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Cardiaothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
P S Nagaraja
Department of Cardiac Anaesthesia, Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences and Research, Bengaluru - 560 069, Karnataka
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_15_18

Rights and Permissions

Background: Good postoperative analgesia in cardiac surgical patients helps in early recovery and ambulation. An alternative to parenteral, paravertebral, and thoracic epidural analgesia can be pectoralis nerve (Pecs) block, which is novel, less invasive regional analgesic technique. Aims: We hypothesized that Pecs block would provide superior postoperative analgesia for patients undergoing cardiac surgery through midline sternotomy compared to parenteral analgesia. Materials and Methods: Forty adult patients between the age groups of 25 and 65 years undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting or valve surgeries through midline sternotomy under general anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups with 20 in each group. Group 1 patients did not receive Pecs block, whereas Group 2 patients received bilateral Pecs block postoperatively. Patients were extubated once they fulfilled extubation criteria. Ventilator duration was recorded. Patients were interrogated for pain by visual analog scale (VAS) scoring at rest and cough. Inspiratory flow rate was assessed using incentive spirometry. Results: Pecs group patients required lesser duration of ventilator support (P < 0.0001) in comparison to control group. Pain scores at rest and cough were significantly low in Pecs group at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 h from extubation (P < 0.05). At 24 h, VAS scores were comparable between two groups. Peak inspiratory flow rates were higher in Pecs group as compared to control group at 0, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h (P < 0.05). Thirty-four episodes of rescue analgesia were given in control group, whereas in Pecs group, there were only four episodes of rescue analgesia. Conclusion: Pecs block is technically simple and effective technique and can be used as part of multimodal analgesia in postoperative cardiac surgical patients for better patient comfort and outcome.






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