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Long-term quality of life postacute kidney injury in cardiac surgery patients


1 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK
2 University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WS1 3BD, UK
3 Department of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesiology, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK
4 Department of Nephrology, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK

Correspondence Address:
Pankaj Kumar Mishra
Consultant Cardiothoracic Surgeon Lancashire Cardiac Centre; Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust ; Whinney Heys Rd, Blackpool FY3 8NR Blackpool
UK
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_104_17

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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 41-45

 

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Background: Acute renal failure after cardiac surgery is known to be associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality. There have as yet been no major reports on long-term quality of life (QOL). This study assessed the impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) and renal replacement therapy (RRT) on long-term survival and QOL after cardiac surgery. The need for long-term RRT is also assessed. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2005 and 2011 (n = 6087) and developed AKI (RIFLE criteria, n = 570) were included. They were propensity-matched 1:1 to patients without renal impairment (control). Data were prospectively collected, and health-related QOL questionnaire was sent to patients who were alive at least 1-year postoperatively at the time of the study. Results: There was no significant difference in the preoperative characteristics between the two groups (age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, procedure, urgency, logistic Euroscore), respectively. Median follow-up was 52 months. Survival data were available in all patients. Questionnaires were returned in 64% of eligible patients. Long-term survival was significantly lower, and QOL, in particular the physical aspect, was significantly worse for the AKI group as compared to non-AKI group (38.8 vs. 44.2, P = 0.002), especially so in patients who required RRT. In alive respondents, despite an 18% (66/359) incidence of ongoing renal follow-up, the need for late RRT was only in 1.1% (4/359). Conclusion: AKI and especially the need for RRT following cardiac surgery are associated with increased long-term mortality as well as worse quality of life in a propensity-matched control group.






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1 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK
2 University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WS1 3BD, UK
3 Department of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesiology, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK
4 Department of Nephrology, Heart and Lung Centre, Wolverhampton WV10 0QP, UK

Correspondence Address:
Pankaj Kumar Mishra
Consultant Cardiothoracic Surgeon Lancashire Cardiac Centre; Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust ; Whinney Heys Rd, Blackpool FY3 8NR Blackpool
UK
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_104_17

Rights and Permissions

Background: Acute renal failure after cardiac surgery is known to be associated with significant short-term morbidity and mortality. There have as yet been no major reports on long-term quality of life (QOL). This study assessed the impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) and renal replacement therapy (RRT) on long-term survival and QOL after cardiac surgery. The need for long-term RRT is also assessed. Materials and Methods: Patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 2005 and 2011 (n = 6087) and developed AKI (RIFLE criteria, n = 570) were included. They were propensity-matched 1:1 to patients without renal impairment (control). Data were prospectively collected, and health-related QOL questionnaire was sent to patients who were alive at least 1-year postoperatively at the time of the study. Results: There was no significant difference in the preoperative characteristics between the two groups (age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, procedure, urgency, logistic Euroscore), respectively. Median follow-up was 52 months. Survival data were available in all patients. Questionnaires were returned in 64% of eligible patients. Long-term survival was significantly lower, and QOL, in particular the physical aspect, was significantly worse for the AKI group as compared to non-AKI group (38.8 vs. 44.2, P = 0.002), especially so in patients who required RRT. In alive respondents, despite an 18% (66/359) incidence of ongoing renal follow-up, the need for late RRT was only in 1.1% (4/359). Conclusion: AKI and especially the need for RRT following cardiac surgery are associated with increased long-term mortality as well as worse quality of life in a propensity-matched control group.






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