Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1610    
    Printed66    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded430    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Comparative study of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during cardio-pulmonary bypass.


Department of Anaesthesiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
P Poswal
Department of Anaesthesiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17827561

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Year : 2004  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 44-50

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for

  Article in PDF (84 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
The use of nonpulsatile flow during extracorporeal circulation remains popular despite theoretical advantages of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Pulsatile CPB is considered to be more physiological than nonpulsatile flow as the pulsatile energy ensures the patency of the vascular bed and mechanical motion of tissue fluid around the cell membrane, improves microcirculation and enhances diffusion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow on the coagulation profile, liver and kidney function and also on the haemodynamics in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting on CPB. One hundred patients between 35 and 65 years of age with normal left ventricular function were randomly divided into two equal groups: Pulsatile (P) and nonpulsatile (NP). Haematological parameters, clotting profile, renal parameters, hepatic function tests and haemodynamic variables were measured preoperatively and postoperatively at specific intervals. Surgical, anaesthetic and CPB regimen was standard in all cases. There was a decrease in platelet count during and after CPB in both groups. Coagulation profile and renal function parameters remained similar in both groups except that creatinine clearance was better in group P on the first postoperative day. Urine output was also better in group P. There was no change in liver function tests in both groups. The haemodynamic variables were comparable in both groups. The systemic vascular resistance was higher in group NP postoperatively and oxygen consumption was higher in group P post CPB. In conclusion we did not find any significant difference between pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during CPB except the creatinine clearance and urine output were better in pulsatile group.






[PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




Department of Anaesthesiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
P Poswal
Department of Anaesthesiology, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17827561

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

The use of nonpulsatile flow during extracorporeal circulation remains popular despite theoretical advantages of pulsatile cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Pulsatile CPB is considered to be more physiological than nonpulsatile flow as the pulsatile energy ensures the patency of the vascular bed and mechanical motion of tissue fluid around the cell membrane, improves microcirculation and enhances diffusion. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow on the coagulation profile, liver and kidney function and also on the haemodynamics in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting on CPB. One hundred patients between 35 and 65 years of age with normal left ventricular function were randomly divided into two equal groups: Pulsatile (P) and nonpulsatile (NP). Haematological parameters, clotting profile, renal parameters, hepatic function tests and haemodynamic variables were measured preoperatively and postoperatively at specific intervals. Surgical, anaesthetic and CPB regimen was standard in all cases. There was a decrease in platelet count during and after CPB in both groups. Coagulation profile and renal function parameters remained similar in both groups except that creatinine clearance was better in group P on the first postoperative day. Urine output was also better in group P. There was no change in liver function tests in both groups. The haemodynamic variables were comparable in both groups. The systemic vascular resistance was higher in group NP postoperatively and oxygen consumption was higher in group P post CPB. In conclusion we did not find any significant difference between pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow during CPB except the creatinine clearance and urine output were better in pulsatile group.






[PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article