Year : 2020  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 134--141

Cardioprotective effects of propofol-dexmedetomidine in open-heart surgery: A prospective double-blind study


Ahmed Said Elgebaly1, Sameh Mohamad Fathy1, Ayman Ahmed Sallam2, Yaser Elbarbary3 
1 Department of Anesthesia and PSICU, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt
3 Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed Said Elgebaly
Department of Anaesthesia and PSICU, 19 Elfaloga Street, Elgharbia, Tanta
Egypt

Background: Myocardial protection in cardiac surgeries is a must and requires multimodal approaches in perioperative period to decrease and prevent the increase of myocardial oxygen demand and consumption that lead to postoperative cardiac complications including myocardial ischemia, dysfunction, and heart failure. Study Design: Prospective, controlled, randomized, double-blinded study. Aims: This study aims to study the effect of propofol-dexmedetomidine continuous infusion cardioprotection during open-heart surgery in adult patients. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients of both sexes aged from 30 to 60 years old belonging to the American Society of Anesthesiologists III or IV undergoing open-heart surgery were randomly divided into two equal groups: Group P (control group) received continuous infusion of propofol at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h and 50 cc 0.9% sodium chloride solution infused at a rate of 0.4 μg/kg/h (used as a placebo) and Group PD received continuous infusion of propofol at a rate of 2 mg/kg/h and dexmedetomidine 200 μg diluted in 50 cc 0.9% sodium chloride solution infused at a rate of 0.4 μg/kg/h. Infusion for all patients started immediately preoperative till skin closure. Hemodynamic measurements of heart rate (HR), invasive mean arterial pressure, and oxygen saturation were recorded at baseline before induction of anesthesia, immediately after intubation, at skin incision, at sternotomy and every 15 min in the 1st h then every 30 min during the prebypass period then every 15 min in the 1st h then every 30 min after weaning from CPB till the end of the surgery. Serum biomarkers; cardiac troponin (cTnI) and creatine kinase-myocardial bound (CK-MB) samples were measured basally (T1), 15 min after unclamping of the aorta (T2), immediate postoperative (T3), and 24 h postoperative (T4). Intraoperative data were also recorded including the number of coronary grafts, aortic cross-clamping duration, duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), duration of surgery, and rhythm of reperfusion. Fentanyl requirement, extubation time, and length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay were also recorded for every case. Results: There was no statistically significant differences as regard to demographic data between the studied two groups. HR and blood pressure recorded was lower in the PD group than the control group, and this difference was noted to be statistically significant. Furthermore, the PD group showed lower levels of myocardial enzymes (cTnI and CK-MB), decreased total fentanyl requirement, earlier postoperative extubation, and shorter ICU stay than the P(control) group. Conclusion: The use of propofol-dexmedetomidine in CPB surgeries offers more cardioprotective effects than the use of propofol alone.


How to cite this article:
Elgebaly AS, Fathy SM, Sallam AA, Elbarbary Y. Cardioprotective effects of propofol-dexmedetomidine in open-heart surgery: A prospective double-blind study.Ann Card Anaesth 2020;23:134-141


How to cite this URL:
Elgebaly AS, Fathy SM, Sallam AA, Elbarbary Y. Cardioprotective effects of propofol-dexmedetomidine in open-heart surgery: A prospective double-blind study. Ann Card Anaesth [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jun 2 ];23:134-141
Available from: http://www.annals.in/article.asp?issn=0971-9784;year=2020;volume=23;issue=2;spage=134;epage=141;aulast=Elgebaly;type=0