Year : 2018  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 363--370

The efficacy of different modes of analgesia in postoperative pain management and early mobilization in postoperative cardiac surgical patients: A systematic review


Brenda Nachiyunde1, Louisa Lam2 
1 Department of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of South Australia, City East Campus, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia
2 School of Nursing and Healthcare Professions, Federation University Australia, Berwick, Victoria, 3806, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Louisa Lam
Deputy Dean, School of Nursing and Healthcare Professions, Federation University Australia, Office 1121, Building 903, Berwick Campus, PO Box 859, Berwick VIC 3806, 100 Clyde Rd, Berwick
Australia

Cardiac surgery induces severe postoperative pain and impairment of pulmonary function, increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and increases mortality and morbidity; therefore, evaluation of the evidence is needed to assess the comparative benefits of different techniques of pain management, to guide clinical practice, and to identify areas of further research. A systematic search of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, DARE database, Joanna Briggs Institute, Google scholar, PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Academic OneFile, SCOPUS, and Academic search premier was conducted retrieving 1875 articles. This was for pain management postcardiac surgery in intensive care. Four hundred and seventy-one article titles and 266 abstracts screened, 52 full text articles retrieved for critical appraisal, and ten studies were included including 511 patients. Postoperative pain (patient reported), complications, and LOS in intensive care and the hospital were evaluated. Anesthetic infiltrations and intercostal or parasternal blocks are recommended the immediate postoperative period (4–6 h), and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and local subcutaneous anesthetic infusions are recommended immediate postoperative and 24–72 h postcardiac surgery. However, the use of mixed techniques, that is, PCA with opioids and local anesthetic subcutaneous infusions might be the way to go in pain management postcardiac surgery to avoid oversedation and severe nausea and vomiting from the narcotics. Adequate studies in the use of ketamine for pain management postcardiac surgery need to be done and it should be used cautiously.


How to cite this article:
Nachiyunde B, Lam L. The efficacy of different modes of analgesia in postoperative pain management and early mobilization in postoperative cardiac surgical patients: A systematic review.Ann Card Anaesth 2018;21:363-370


How to cite this URL:
Nachiyunde B, Lam L. The efficacy of different modes of analgesia in postoperative pain management and early mobilization in postoperative cardiac surgical patients: A systematic review. Ann Card Anaesth [serial online] 2018 [cited 2019 Mar 20 ];21:363-370
Available from: http://www.annals.in/article.asp?issn=0971-9784;year=2018;volume=21;issue=4;spage=363;epage=370;aulast=Nachiyunde;type=0