Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 245--250

Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics


Mario Montealegre-Gallegos1, Feroze Mahmood1, Han Kim2, Remco Bergman3, John D Mitchell1, Ruma Bose1, Katie M Hawthorne4, T David O'Halloran4, Vanessa Wong1, Philip E Hess1, Robina Matyal1 
1 Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2 Department of Anesthesia, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada
3 Department of Anaesthesiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
4 Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Correspondence Address:
Mario Montealegre-Gallegos
Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
USA

Background: Proficiency in transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) requires an integration of cognitive knowledge and psychomotor skills. Whereas cognitive knowledge can be quantified, psychomotor skills are implied after repetitive task performance. We applied motion analyses to evaluate psychomotor skill acquisition during simulator-based TTE training. Methods and Results: During the first month of their fellowship training, 16 cardiology fellows underwent a multimodal TTE training program for 4 weeks (8 sessions). The program consisted of online and live didactics as well as simulator training. Kinematic metrics (path length, time, probe accelerations) were obtained at the start and end of the course for 8 standard TTE views using a simulator. At the end of the course TTE image acquisition skills were tested on human models. After completion of the training program the trainees reported improved self-perceived comfort with TTE imaging. There was also an increase of 8.7% in post-test knowledge scores. There was a reduction in the number of probe accelerations [median decrease 49.5, 95% CI = 29-73, adjusted P < 0.01], total time [median decrease 10.6 s, 95% CI = 6.6-15.5, adjusted P < 0.01] and path length [median decrease 8.8 cm, 95% CI = 2.2-17.7, adjusted P < 0.01] from the start to the end of the course. During evaluation on human models, the trainees were able to obtain all the required TTE views without instructor assistance. Conclusion: Simulator-derived motion analyses can be used to objectively quantify acquisition of psychomotor skills during TTE training. Such an approach could be used to assess readiness for clinical practice of TTE.


How to cite this article:
Montealegre-Gallegos M, Mahmood F, Kim H, Bergman R, Mitchell JD, Bose R, Hawthorne KM, O'Halloran T D, Wong V, Hess PE, Matyal R. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics.Ann Card Anaesth 2016;19:245-250


How to cite this URL:
Montealegre-Gallegos M, Mahmood F, Kim H, Bergman R, Mitchell JD, Bose R, Hawthorne KM, O'Halloran T D, Wong V, Hess PE, Matyal R. Imaging skills for transthoracic echocardiography in cardiology fellows: The value of motion metrics. Ann Card Anaesth [serial online] 2016 [cited 2019 Dec 13 ];19:245-250
Available from: http://www.annals.in/article.asp?issn=0971-9784;year=2016;volume=19;issue=2;spage=245;epage=250;aulast=Montealegre-Gallegos;type=0