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Blood transfusion and lung surgeries in pediatric age group: A single center retrospective study


1 Department of Anesthesia, Surgical Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tanta, Egypt
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed S Elgebaly
Department of Anaesthesia and PSIC, 19 Elfaloga Street, Elgharbia, Tanta
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_210_18

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Year : 2020  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 149-153

 

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Background: Blood transfusion is not without harm, and recent studies suggest association between transfusion and poor outcome in critically ill patients. Although it is prescribed for many reasons based on the firm belief that blood transfusion improves oxygen carrying capacity, it carries notable adverse hazards. Importantly, lung surgeries are counted as moderate to high-risk operations and take a significant risk of blood loss. Aim: This study aims to reveal the association between blood transfusion and poor clinical outcomes and characterize the epidemiology of blood transfusion after pediatric chest surgery. Settings and Design: Retrospective cohort study, done throughout 3 years. Materials and Methods: A total of 248 patients who underwent open thoracotomy and lung surgery and aged ≤18 years were classified according to the need of intraoperative or postoperative blood transfusion into two groups: Group I (non-transfused = 130) and Group II (transfused = 118). Statistical Analysis: SPSS v25 was used for analysis. Results: Transfusion probability ranged between 42.8% and 50% according to type of surgery. As regard to postoperative variables, there was no significant difference between both groups regarding the duration of analgesia, allergic reactions, need of re-operation and in-hospital mortality. However, transfused group showed significant increase in duration of antibiotic, persistent postoperative fever, time to remove chest drains, ICU stays, hospital stay and pneumonia. Incidence of pneumonia had a relative risk 1.82 with transfused compared to non-transfused group. Conclusion: Transfusion group in pediatrics undergoing lung surgeries in our study was more prone to adverse outcomes such as pneumonia, delayed time to remove chest drains, prolonged ICU stay, and hospital stay.






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1 Department of Anesthesia, Surgical Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Tanta, Egypt
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed S Elgebaly
Department of Anaesthesia and PSIC, 19 Elfaloga Street, Elgharbia, Tanta
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_210_18

Rights and Permissions

Background: Blood transfusion is not without harm, and recent studies suggest association between transfusion and poor outcome in critically ill patients. Although it is prescribed for many reasons based on the firm belief that blood transfusion improves oxygen carrying capacity, it carries notable adverse hazards. Importantly, lung surgeries are counted as moderate to high-risk operations and take a significant risk of blood loss. Aim: This study aims to reveal the association between blood transfusion and poor clinical outcomes and characterize the epidemiology of blood transfusion after pediatric chest surgery. Settings and Design: Retrospective cohort study, done throughout 3 years. Materials and Methods: A total of 248 patients who underwent open thoracotomy and lung surgery and aged ≤18 years were classified according to the need of intraoperative or postoperative blood transfusion into two groups: Group I (non-transfused = 130) and Group II (transfused = 118). Statistical Analysis: SPSS v25 was used for analysis. Results: Transfusion probability ranged between 42.8% and 50% according to type of surgery. As regard to postoperative variables, there was no significant difference between both groups regarding the duration of analgesia, allergic reactions, need of re-operation and in-hospital mortality. However, transfused group showed significant increase in duration of antibiotic, persistent postoperative fever, time to remove chest drains, ICU stays, hospital stay and pneumonia. Incidence of pneumonia had a relative risk 1.82 with transfused compared to non-transfused group. Conclusion: Transfusion group in pediatrics undergoing lung surgeries in our study was more prone to adverse outcomes such as pneumonia, delayed time to remove chest drains, prolonged ICU stay, and hospital stay.






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