Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed208    
    Printed7    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded21    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Sternal osteomyelitis by Gordonia Bronchialis in an immunocompetent patient after open heart surgery


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA
2 Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
3 Department of Cardiology, Era Medical Institute, Lucknow, India
4 Department of Cardiology, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA
5 Department of Infectious Disease, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paurush Ambesh
Department of Internal Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City - 11219
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_125_18

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2019  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 221-224

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (745 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Gordonia is a catalase-positive, aerobic, nocardioform, Gram-positive staining actinomycete that also shows weak acid-fast staining. Several Gordonia species are commonly found in the soil. The bacterium has been isolated from the saliva of domesticated/wild dogs as well. In hospitalized patients, most commonly it is found in the setting of intravascular catheter-related infections. However, recent reports show that it is being increasingly isolated from sternal wounds, skin/neoplastic specimens and from pleural effusions. Gordonia shares many common characteristics with Rhodococcus and Nocardia. Ergo, it is commonly misrecognized as Nocardia or Rhodococcus. Since this pathogen requires comprehensive morphological and biochemical testing, it is often difficult and cumbersome to isolate the species. Broad-range Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing with genes like 16S rRNA or hsp65 are used to correctly identify the species. Identification is essential for choosing and narrowing the right antimicrobial agent. Herein, we report our experience with a patient who presented with sternal osteomyelitis after infection with this elusive bug.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




1 Department of Internal Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA
2 Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
3 Department of Cardiology, Era Medical Institute, Lucknow, India
4 Department of Cardiology, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA
5 Department of Infectious Disease, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paurush Ambesh
Department of Internal Medicine, Maimonides Medical Center, New York City - 11219
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_125_18

Rights and Permissions

Gordonia is a catalase-positive, aerobic, nocardioform, Gram-positive staining actinomycete that also shows weak acid-fast staining. Several Gordonia species are commonly found in the soil. The bacterium has been isolated from the saliva of domesticated/wild dogs as well. In hospitalized patients, most commonly it is found in the setting of intravascular catheter-related infections. However, recent reports show that it is being increasingly isolated from sternal wounds, skin/neoplastic specimens and from pleural effusions. Gordonia shares many common characteristics with Rhodococcus and Nocardia. Ergo, it is commonly misrecognized as Nocardia or Rhodococcus. Since this pathogen requires comprehensive morphological and biochemical testing, it is often difficult and cumbersome to isolate the species. Broad-range Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and sequencing with genes like 16S rRNA or hsp65 are used to correctly identify the species. Identification is essential for choosing and narrowing the right antimicrobial agent. Herein, we report our experience with a patient who presented with sternal osteomyelitis after infection with this elusive bug.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article