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A comparative study of safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided infra-clavicular axillary vein cannulation versus ultrasound-guided internal jugular vein cannulation in adult cardiac surgical patients


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiac Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Prajakta D Shinde
Department of Anaesthesiology, Fortis Hospital, Mulund Goregaon Link Road, Mulund West, Mumbai - 400 078, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_24_18

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Year : 2019  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 177-186

 

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Background: Ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation is a widely accepted standard procedure. The axillary vein (AV) in comparison to the subclavian vein is easily visualized, but its cannulation is not extensively studied in cardiac patients. Aims: This study is an attempt to study the efficacy of real-time US-guided axillary venous cannulation as a safe alternative for the time-tested US-guided IJV cannulation. Design: This is a prospective randomized controlled study. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 adult patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were divided equally in Group A-US-guided IJV cannulation, and Group B-US-guided axillary venous cannulation. Under local anesthesia and real-time US guidance the IJV or AV was secured. The access time, guidewire time, and procedure time were noted. Furthermore, the number of needle attempts, malposition, change of site, and complications were noted. Results: The data were analyzed for 49 patients in Group A and 48 patients in the Group B due to exclusions. The access time and the guidewire time were comparable in both groups. The first attempt needle puncture was successful for the IJV group in 98% of patients in comparison to 95% of patients in Group B. Guidewire was passed in the first attempt in 94% in Group A and 89% in the Group B. Except for arterial puncture in one case in group A, the complications were insignificant in both groups. Conclusion: The study shows that the US-guided AV cannulation may serve as an effective alternative to the IJV cannulation in cardiac surgery.






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1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiac Surgery, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology, Fortis Hospital, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Prajakta D Shinde
Department of Anaesthesiology, Fortis Hospital, Mulund Goregaon Link Road, Mulund West, Mumbai - 400 078, Maharashtra
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_24_18

Rights and Permissions

Background: Ultrasound (US)-guided internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulation is a widely accepted standard procedure. The axillary vein (AV) in comparison to the subclavian vein is easily visualized, but its cannulation is not extensively studied in cardiac patients. Aims: This study is an attempt to study the efficacy of real-time US-guided axillary venous cannulation as a safe alternative for the time-tested US-guided IJV cannulation. Design: This is a prospective randomized controlled study. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 adult patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were divided equally in Group A-US-guided IJV cannulation, and Group B-US-guided axillary venous cannulation. Under local anesthesia and real-time US guidance the IJV or AV was secured. The access time, guidewire time, and procedure time were noted. Furthermore, the number of needle attempts, malposition, change of site, and complications were noted. Results: The data were analyzed for 49 patients in Group A and 48 patients in the Group B due to exclusions. The access time and the guidewire time were comparable in both groups. The first attempt needle puncture was successful for the IJV group in 98% of patients in comparison to 95% of patients in Group B. Guidewire was passed in the first attempt in 94% in Group A and 89% in the Group B. Except for arterial puncture in one case in group A, the complications were insignificant in both groups. Conclusion: The study shows that the US-guided AV cannulation may serve as an effective alternative to the IJV cannulation in cardiac surgery.






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