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Does bilevel positive airway pressure improve outcome of acute respiratory failure after open-heart surgery?


Department of Anesthesia and PSICUD, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed Said Elgebaly
Department of Anaesthesia and SICUD, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, 19 Elfaloga St, Elgharbia, Tanta
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_95_17

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Year : 2017  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 416-421

 

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Background: Respiratory failure is of concern in the postoperative period after cardiac surgeries. Invasive ventilation (intermittent positive pressure ventilation [IPPV]) carries the risks and complications of intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Aims: Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is an alternative method and as effective as IPPV in treating insufficiency of respiration with less complications and minimal effects on respiratory and hemodynamic parameters next to open-heart surgery. Design: This is a prospective, randomized and controlled study. Materials and Methods: Forty-four patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were divided into two equal groups: Group I (IPPV) and Group II (NIPPV). Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), arterial blood gas, weaning time, reintubation, tracheotomy rate, MV time, postoperative hospital stay, and ventilator-associated pneumonia during the period of hospital stay were recorded. Results: There was statistically significant difference in HR between groups with higher in Group I at 30 and 60 min and at 12 and 24 h. According to MAP, it started to increase significantly at hypoxemia, 15 min, 30 min, 4 h, 12 h, and at 24 h which was higher in Group I also. RR, PaO2, and PaCO2showed significant higher in Group II at 15, 30, and 60 min and 4 h. According to pH, there was a significant difference between groups at 15, 30, and 60 min and at 4, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. SpO2showed higher significant values in Group I at 15 and 30 min and at 12 h postoperatively. Duration of postoperative supportive ventilation was higher in Group I than that of Group II with statistically significant difference. Complications were statistically insignificant between Group I and Group II. Conclusion: Our study showed superiority of invasive over noninvasive mode of ventilator support. However, NIPPV (bilevel positive airway pressure) was proved to be a safe method.






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Department of Anesthesia and PSICUD, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ahmed Said Elgebaly
Department of Anaesthesia and SICUD, Faculty of Medicine, Tanta University, 19 Elfaloga St, Elgharbia, Tanta
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.ACA_95_17

Rights and Permissions

Background: Respiratory failure is of concern in the postoperative period after cardiac surgeries. Invasive ventilation (intermittent positive pressure ventilation [IPPV]) carries the risks and complications of intubation and mechanical ventilation (MV). Aims: Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV) is an alternative method and as effective as IPPV in treating insufficiency of respiration with less complications and minimal effects on respiratory and hemodynamic parameters next to open-heart surgery. Design: This is a prospective, randomized and controlled study. Materials and Methods: Forty-four patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were divided into two equal groups: Group I (IPPV) and Group II (NIPPV). Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), respiratory rate (RR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), arterial blood gas, weaning time, reintubation, tracheotomy rate, MV time, postoperative hospital stay, and ventilator-associated pneumonia during the period of hospital stay were recorded. Results: There was statistically significant difference in HR between groups with higher in Group I at 30 and 60 min and at 12 and 24 h. According to MAP, it started to increase significantly at hypoxemia, 15 min, 30 min, 4 h, 12 h, and at 24 h which was higher in Group I also. RR, PaO2, and PaCO2showed significant higher in Group II at 15, 30, and 60 min and 4 h. According to pH, there was a significant difference between groups at 15, 30, and 60 min and at 4, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. SpO2showed higher significant values in Group I at 15 and 30 min and at 12 h postoperatively. Duration of postoperative supportive ventilation was higher in Group I than that of Group II with statistically significant difference. Complications were statistically insignificant between Group I and Group II. Conclusion: Our study showed superiority of invasive over noninvasive mode of ventilator support. However, NIPPV (bilevel positive airway pressure) was proved to be a safe method.






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