Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1008    
    Printed19    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded102    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal

Postoperative metabolic acidosis following the minimally invasive radiofrequency maze procedure


Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, CVC 4172, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 5861, USA

Correspondence Address:
Raymond Patrick Hom
225 S. Lake Avenue, Suite 535, Pasadena, CA, 91101
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.173016

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 25-30

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (377 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the world. While medical treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs remains the primary treatment modality, symptomatic refractory AF often requires treatment with a catheter or surgical ablation. One minimally invasive therapy is the Mini-Maze procedure, which utilizes epicardial radiofrequency ablation via a subxiphoid approach to rid the heart of arrhythmogenic atrial foci without a median sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. The goal of this retrospective cohort study was to identify clinical factors associated with metabolic acidosis following the Mini-Maze procedure. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, we studied patients undergoing the Mini-Maze procedure, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting or patients conventional Cox-Maze on cardiopulmonary bypass. The first base deficit value obtained in the Intensive Care Unit was used as a measure of metabolic acidosis. Using logistic regression with Akaike information criteria, we analyzed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data to determine the factors associated with changes in base deficit. Results: A multivariable model using stepwise selection demonstrated that diabetes mellitus and weight were associated with a decrease in the base deficit by 2.87 mEq/L (95% CI: −5.55-−0.19) and 0.04 mEq/L (95%CI: −0.08, 0.004), respectively. Furthermore, creatinine was associated with a 1.57 mEq/L (95% CI: 0.14, 2.99) increase in the base deficit. Conclusion: The Mini-Maze procedure was not associated with postoperative metabolic acidosis. Instead, nondiabetic patients and patients with higher creatinine were associated with greater base deficits after undergoing cardiac surgery.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




Department of Anesthesiology, University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, CVC 4172, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 5861, USA

Correspondence Address:
Raymond Patrick Hom
225 S. Lake Avenue, Suite 535, Pasadena, CA, 91101
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.173016

Rights and Permissions

Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia treated in the world. While medical treatment with antiarrhythmic drugs remains the primary treatment modality, symptomatic refractory AF often requires treatment with a catheter or surgical ablation. One minimally invasive therapy is the Mini-Maze procedure, which utilizes epicardial radiofrequency ablation via a subxiphoid approach to rid the heart of arrhythmogenic atrial foci without a median sternotomy or cardiopulmonary bypass. The goal of this retrospective cohort study was to identify clinical factors associated with metabolic acidosis following the Mini-Maze procedure. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Review Board approval, we studied patients undergoing the Mini-Maze procedure, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting or patients conventional Cox-Maze on cardiopulmonary bypass. The first base deficit value obtained in the Intensive Care Unit was used as a measure of metabolic acidosis. Using logistic regression with Akaike information criteria, we analyzed preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data to determine the factors associated with changes in base deficit. Results: A multivariable model using stepwise selection demonstrated that diabetes mellitus and weight were associated with a decrease in the base deficit by 2.87 mEq/L (95% CI: −5.55-−0.19) and 0.04 mEq/L (95%CI: −0.08, 0.004), respectively. Furthermore, creatinine was associated with a 1.57 mEq/L (95% CI: 0.14, 2.99) increase in the base deficit. Conclusion: The Mini-Maze procedure was not associated with postoperative metabolic acidosis. Instead, nondiabetic patients and patients with higher creatinine were associated with greater base deficits after undergoing cardiac surgery.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article