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Incidence and implications of coronary artery disease in patients undergoing valvular heart surgery: The Indian scenario


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Deepak K Tempe
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive care, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi - 110 002
India
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Source of Support: Institutional, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.109732

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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 86-91

 

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Aims and Objectives: We evaluated the incidence and implications of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients above 40 years presenting for valve surgery. Materials and Methods: Between January 2009 and December 2010, coronary angiography (CAG) was performed in all such patients ( n = 140). Results: Coronaries were normal in 119 (Group I), and diseased in 21 (Group II). In Group II, 11 patients were < 50 years, 3 were between 51 and 60 years and 7 were > 61 years. In 8 of these, only valve replacement was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and aortic valve replacement was performed in 10, CABG and mitral valve replacement in 2 and CABG with mitral and aortic valve replacement in one. The number of vessels grafted in these 13 patients was 1.54 ± 0.66. Hypertension and diabetes were significant ( P < 0.05) in this group. The mortality was significant in Group II (11 vs. 6, P < 0.05). Six patients died in Group II, 5 had severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular hypertrophy; the sixth patient had severe mitral stenosis and was in CHF. The predominant cause of death was congestive heart failure (CHF). Conclusions: Fifteen percentage of these patients had CAD. CAG should be performed routinely in these patients while presenting for valve surgery. Combined CABG and valve replacement carries high mortality (28.5%), especially in patients with aortic stenosis. The study suggests that the cardio-protective measures should be applied more rigorously in this subset of patients.






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1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Deepak K Tempe
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive care, G. B. Pant Hospital, New Delhi - 110 002
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Institutional, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.109732

Rights and Permissions

Aims and Objectives: We evaluated the incidence and implications of coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients above 40 years presenting for valve surgery. Materials and Methods: Between January 2009 and December 2010, coronary angiography (CAG) was performed in all such patients ( n = 140). Results: Coronaries were normal in 119 (Group I), and diseased in 21 (Group II). In Group II, 11 patients were < 50 years, 3 were between 51 and 60 years and 7 were > 61 years. In 8 of these, only valve replacement was performed. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and aortic valve replacement was performed in 10, CABG and mitral valve replacement in 2 and CABG with mitral and aortic valve replacement in one. The number of vessels grafted in these 13 patients was 1.54 ± 0.66. Hypertension and diabetes were significant ( P < 0.05) in this group. The mortality was significant in Group II (11 vs. 6, P < 0.05). Six patients died in Group II, 5 had severe aortic stenosis and severe left ventricular hypertrophy; the sixth patient had severe mitral stenosis and was in CHF. The predominant cause of death was congestive heart failure (CHF). Conclusions: Fifteen percentage of these patients had CAD. CAG should be performed routinely in these patients while presenting for valve surgery. Combined CABG and valve replacement carries high mortality (28.5%), especially in patients with aortic stenosis. The study suggests that the cardio-protective measures should be applied more rigorously in this subset of patients.






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