Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
CASE REPORT  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed9228    
    Printed251    
    Emailed14    
    PDF Downloaded257    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

Magnets and implantable cardioverter defibrillators: What's the problem?


1 Clinical Anaesthesiology, Division of Cardiac Anesthesia and Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA
2 Clinical Anaesthesiology, Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA
3 Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Yiliam F Rodriguez-Blanco
Department of Anaesthesiology/Division of Cardiac Anaesthesia, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1611 NW 12th Avenue. Central Building C-302, Miami FL, 33136
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.105372

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2013  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 54-57

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (403 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
A growing number of surgical patients present to the operating room with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). Peri-operative care of these patients dictates that ICD function be suspended for many surgical procedures to avoid inappropriate, and possibly harmful, ICD therapy triggered by electromagnetic interference (EMI). An alternative to reprogramming the ICD is the use of a magnet to temporarily suspend its function. However, this approach is not without complications. We report a case where magnet use failed to inhibit ICD sensing of EMI, and a shock was delivered to the patient. Measures to decrease EMI, controversies regarding magnet use, and expert recommendations are discussed.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 CASE REPORT
 




1 Clinical Anaesthesiology, Division of Cardiac Anesthesia and Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA
2 Clinical Anaesthesiology, Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA
3 Department of Anaesthesiology, Perioperative Medicine and Pain Management, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA

Correspondence Address:
Yiliam F Rodriguez-Blanco
Department of Anaesthesiology/Division of Cardiac Anaesthesia, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1611 NW 12th Avenue. Central Building C-302, Miami FL, 33136
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.105372

Rights and Permissions

A growing number of surgical patients present to the operating room with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). Peri-operative care of these patients dictates that ICD function be suspended for many surgical procedures to avoid inappropriate, and possibly harmful, ICD therapy triggered by electromagnetic interference (EMI). An alternative to reprogramming the ICD is the use of a magnet to temporarily suspend its function. However, this approach is not without complications. We report a case where magnet use failed to inhibit ICD sensing of EMI, and a shock was delivered to the patient. Measures to decrease EMI, controversies regarding magnet use, and expert recommendations are discussed.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article