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The effects of dexmedetomidine on attenuation of stress response to endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting


1 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
Ranjith Baskar Karthekeyan
Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, No 1, Ramachandra Nagar, Porur, Chennai 600116
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.91480

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Year : 2012  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 39-43

 

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This study was designed to study the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine for attenuation of cardiovascular responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients with coronary artery disease. Sixty adult patients scheduled for elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were randomly allocated to receive dexmedetomidine (0.5 mcg/kg) or normal saline 15 min before intubation. Patients were compared for hemodynamic changes (heart rate, arterial blood pressure and pulmonary artery pressure) at baseline, 5 min after drug infusion, before intubation and 1, 3 and 5 min after intubation. The dexmedetomidine group had a better control of hemodynamics during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine at a dose of 0.5 mcg/kg as 10-min infusion was administered prior to induction of general anesthesia attenuates the sympathetic response to laryngoscopy and intubation in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization. The authors suggest its administration even in patients receiving beta blockers.






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1 Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India
2 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
Ranjith Baskar Karthekeyan
Department of Cardiac Anaesthesiology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, No 1, Ramachandra Nagar, Porur, Chennai 600116
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.91480

Rights and Permissions

This study was designed to study the efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine for attenuation of cardiovascular responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients with coronary artery disease. Sixty adult patients scheduled for elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were randomly allocated to receive dexmedetomidine (0.5 mcg/kg) or normal saline 15 min before intubation. Patients were compared for hemodynamic changes (heart rate, arterial blood pressure and pulmonary artery pressure) at baseline, 5 min after drug infusion, before intubation and 1, 3 and 5 min after intubation. The dexmedetomidine group had a better control of hemodynamics during laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine at a dose of 0.5 mcg/kg as 10-min infusion was administered prior to induction of general anesthesia attenuates the sympathetic response to laryngoscopy and intubation in patients undergoing myocardial revascularization. The authors suggest its administration even in patients receiving beta blockers.






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