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Trans-esophageal echocardiography for tricuspid and pulmonary valves


Department of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive care, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals, NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Mahesh R Prabhu
11 Haversham Close, Benton, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE7 7LR
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.53439

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Year : 2009  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 174

 

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Transesophageal echocardiography has been shown to provide unique information about cardiac anatomy, function, hemodynamics and blood flow and is relatively easy to perform with a low risk of complications. Echocardiographic evaluation of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves can be achieved with two-dimensional and Doppler imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography of these valves is more challenging because of their complex structure and their relative distance from the esophagus. Two-dimensional echocardiography allows an accurate visualization of the cardiac chambers and valves and their motion during the cardiac cycle. Doppler echocardiography is the most commonly used diagnostic technique for detecting and evaluating valvular regurgitation. The lack of good quality evidence makes it difficult to recommend a validated quantitative approach but expert consensus recommends a clinically useful qualitative approach. This review ennumerates probe placement, recommended cross-sectional views, flow patterns, quantitative equations including the clinical approach to the noninvasive quantification of both stenotic and regurgitant lesions.






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Department of Cardiothoracic Anaesthesia and Intensive care, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne Hospitals, NHS Trust, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Mahesh R Prabhu
11 Haversham Close, Benton, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE7 7LR
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.53439

Rights and Permissions

Transesophageal echocardiography has been shown to provide unique information about cardiac anatomy, function, hemodynamics and blood flow and is relatively easy to perform with a low risk of complications. Echocardiographic evaluation of the tricuspid and pulmonary valves can be achieved with two-dimensional and Doppler imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography of these valves is more challenging because of their complex structure and their relative distance from the esophagus. Two-dimensional echocardiography allows an accurate visualization of the cardiac chambers and valves and their motion during the cardiac cycle. Doppler echocardiography is the most commonly used diagnostic technique for detecting and evaluating valvular regurgitation. The lack of good quality evidence makes it difficult to recommend a validated quantitative approach but expert consensus recommends a clinically useful qualitative approach. This review ennumerates probe placement, recommended cross-sectional views, flow patterns, quantitative equations including the clinical approach to the noninvasive quantification of both stenotic and regurgitant lesions.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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