Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3963    
    Printed131    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded379    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

Butorphanol premedication to facilitate invasive monitoring in cardiac surgery patients before induction of anaesthesia


1 Department of Anesthesiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Instiute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
2 Upgraded department of Community Medicine, KG Medical College, Lucknow, India

Correspondence Address:
Mukesh Tripathi
Type IV-21, Campus, SGPGIMS, Lucknow - 226014
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.45011

Clinical trial registration None

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2009  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 34-39

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (1,159 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Cannulations (peripheral vein, radial artery and jugular vein) performed for invasive monitoring before induction of anaesthesia in cardiac surgery patients may be associated with stress and anxiety. The efficacy and safety of butorphanol premedication was assessed in setting up of invasive monitoring. The study was a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled one with 70 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. In group-1 patients ( n = 35) (placebo) intramuscular saline was administered 1-2 hours before the surgery in equivalent volume to butorphanol. In group-2 ( n = 35) butorphanol (1, 1.5 and 2 mg for three body weight groups <40 kg, 41-60 kg and >60 kg, respectively) was administered 1-2 hours before surgery. Observer blinded for medication recorded the sedation score, pupil size and pain after each cannulation using visual analogue score (VAS). Student's ' t ' test and Chi-square test for proportions, Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric data was carried out. The median pain score of cannulation in group-2 (butorphanol) in the hand (10 mm) and neck (20 mm) were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower than group-1 (placebo) patients (hand = 30 mm and neck = 40 mm). Pain during neck cannulation was significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced (VAS < 30 mm) in patients with the pupil size of <2.5 mm. Since the pain during neck cannulation was more than pain during hand cannulations in both the groups, we conclude that the intensity of pain depends also upon the site of cannulation. Besides the analgesic effect of butorphanol, its sedative effect helped to effectively decrease the pain during neck cannulation in conscious patients.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




1 Department of Anesthesiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Instiute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India
2 Upgraded department of Community Medicine, KG Medical College, Lucknow, India

Correspondence Address:
Mukesh Tripathi
Type IV-21, Campus, SGPGIMS, Lucknow - 226014
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.45011

Clinical trial registration None

Rights and Permissions

Cannulations (peripheral vein, radial artery and jugular vein) performed for invasive monitoring before induction of anaesthesia in cardiac surgery patients may be associated with stress and anxiety. The efficacy and safety of butorphanol premedication was assessed in setting up of invasive monitoring. The study was a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo controlled one with 70 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery. In group-1 patients ( n = 35) (placebo) intramuscular saline was administered 1-2 hours before the surgery in equivalent volume to butorphanol. In group-2 ( n = 35) butorphanol (1, 1.5 and 2 mg for three body weight groups <40 kg, 41-60 kg and >60 kg, respectively) was administered 1-2 hours before surgery. Observer blinded for medication recorded the sedation score, pupil size and pain after each cannulation using visual analogue score (VAS). Student's ' t ' test and Chi-square test for proportions, Mann-Whitney test for non-parametric data was carried out. The median pain score of cannulation in group-2 (butorphanol) in the hand (10 mm) and neck (20 mm) were significantly ( P < 0.05) lower than group-1 (placebo) patients (hand = 30 mm and neck = 40 mm). Pain during neck cannulation was significantly ( P < 0.05) reduced (VAS < 30 mm) in patients with the pupil size of <2.5 mm. Since the pain during neck cannulation was more than pain during hand cannulations in both the groups, we conclude that the intensity of pain depends also upon the site of cannulation. Besides the analgesic effect of butorphanol, its sedative effect helped to effectively decrease the pain during neck cannulation in conscious patients.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article