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Comparison of continuous thoracic epidural and paravertebral block for postoperative analgesia after robotic-assisted coronary artery bypass surgery


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Cardiac Surgery, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Yatin Mehta
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi - 110 076
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.41576

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Year : 2008  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 91-96

 

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Minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance should elicit minimal pain. Regional analgesic techniques have shown excellent analgesia after thoracotomy. Thus the aim of this study was to compare thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) technique with paravertebral block (PVB) technique in these patients with regard to quality of analgesia, complications, and haemodynamic and respiratory parameters. This was a prospective randomised study involving 36 patients undergoing elective robotic-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). TEA or PVB were administered in these patients. The results revealed no significant differences with regard to demographics, haemodynamics, and arterial blood gases. Pulmonary functions were better maintained in PVB group postoperatively; however, this was statistically insignificant. The quality of analgesia was also comparable in both the groups. We conclude that PVB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after robotic-assisted CABG and is comparable to TEA with regard to quality of analgesia.






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1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Cardiac Surgery, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Yatin Mehta
Department of Anaesthesiology and Critical Care, Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals, New Delhi - 110 076
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.41576

Rights and Permissions

Minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance should elicit minimal pain. Regional analgesic techniques have shown excellent analgesia after thoracotomy. Thus the aim of this study was to compare thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) technique with paravertebral block (PVB) technique in these patients with regard to quality of analgesia, complications, and haemodynamic and respiratory parameters. This was a prospective randomised study involving 36 patients undergoing elective robotic-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). TEA or PVB were administered in these patients. The results revealed no significant differences with regard to demographics, haemodynamics, and arterial blood gases. Pulmonary functions were better maintained in PVB group postoperatively; however, this was statistically insignificant. The quality of analgesia was also comparable in both the groups. We conclude that PVB is a safe and effective technique for postoperative analgesia after robotic-assisted CABG and is comparable to TEA with regard to quality of analgesia.






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