Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2176    
    Printed109    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded183    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

Inhaled amyl nitrite effectively reverses acute catastrophic thromboxane-mediated pulmonary hypertension in pigs


Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine and Anesthesia Service, Malcom Randall Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida., USA

Correspondence Address:
Anver Sidi
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100254, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0254.
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.37936

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2007  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 113-120

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (373 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Acute catastrophic pulmonary vasoconstriction frequently leads to cardiovascular collapse. Rapid and selective pulmonary vasodilation is desired in order to restore haemodynamic stability. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of inhaled amyl nitrite as a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Nine adult swine were anaesthetized. Acute pulmonary hypertension with haemodynamic collapse was induced with a bolus administration of a thromboxane analogue, U46619. Six animals then received a capsule of amyl nitrite. The administration of inhaled amyl nitrite decreased mean pulmonary artery pressure from 423 to 223 mmHg at five minutes (p<0.05), with a concomitant increase in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased from 48891338 to 380195 dyne. sec. cm -5 (by 92% from the maximal pulmonary hypertension change), with significant improvement in systemic haemodynamics. During acute thromboxane-mediated pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, prompt administration of inhaled amyl nitrite was effective in restoring pulmonary and systemic haemodynamics within five minutes.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine and Anesthesia Service, Malcom Randall Veterans Administration Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida., USA

Correspondence Address:
Anver Sidi
Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, PO Box 100254, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0254.
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.37936

Rights and Permissions

Acute catastrophic pulmonary vasoconstriction frequently leads to cardiovascular collapse. Rapid and selective pulmonary vasodilation is desired in order to restore haemodynamic stability. This pilot study examined the effectiveness of inhaled amyl nitrite as a selective pulmonary vasodilator. Nine adult swine were anaesthetized. Acute pulmonary hypertension with haemodynamic collapse was induced with a bolus administration of a thromboxane analogue, U46619. Six animals then received a capsule of amyl nitrite. The administration of inhaled amyl nitrite decreased mean pulmonary artery pressure from 423 to 223 mmHg at five minutes (p<0.05), with a concomitant increase in cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. Pulmonary vascular resistance decreased from 48891338 to 380195 dyne. sec. cm -5 (by 92% from the maximal pulmonary hypertension change), with significant improvement in systemic haemodynamics. During acute thromboxane-mediated pulmonary hypertension with cardiovascular collapse, prompt administration of inhaled amyl nitrite was effective in restoring pulmonary and systemic haemodynamics within five minutes.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article