Next article Search Articles Instructions for authors  Access Statistics | Citation Manager  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE  

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2555    
    Printed158    
    Emailed2    
    PDF Downloaded519    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal

Comparison of sevoflurane and isoflurane in OPCAB surgery


Department of Anaesthesiology & Critical Care Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi., India

Correspondence Address:
Yatin Mehta
Department of Anaesthesiology & Critical Care, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi 110 025.
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.37924

Rights and Permissions

Year : 2007  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 46-50

 

SEARCH
Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles

  Article in PDF (74 KB)
Email article
Print Article
Add to My List
Maintenance of anaesthesia with volatile anaesthetic agents affects the perioperative course of patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. This facilitates adequate depth of anaesthesia, reduction in need of analgesic dosage, early extubation and transfer from Intensive Care Unit. We compared two volatile anaesthetic agents sevoflurane and isoflurane in terms of haemodynamic effects, amount of analgesic needed during surgery, quantity of agent needed for maintenance of anaesthesia and postoperative recovery in 40 patients undergoing OPCAB surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with fantanyl, midazolam and thiopentone, and vecuronium was used for muscle relaxation. An Octopus stabiliser was used and coronary anastomosis was performed using internal mammary artery and saphenous vein grafts. Routine monitoring was performed. The depth of anaesthesia was monitored using Bispectral index monitor. The inspired/expired concentration of anaesthetic agents to maintain the desired BIS and the amount of volatile anaesthetic agent needed was also noted. The amount of analgesic used intraoperatively was noted in both the groups. The 'time of awakening' defined as eye opening on verbal commands, and time of extubation were noted. There were no differences in haemodynamic parameters, depth of anaesthesia, and quantity of agent needed, but patients in isoflurane group required more intraoperative analgesics than sevoflurane group. Time of awakening (48 13 vs 114 21 mins; P < 0.001) and subsequent extubation (124 25 vs 177 36 mins, P<0.001) was earlier in sevoflurane group than isoflurane group. There was no evidence of perioperative myocardial infarction in both the groups. We conclude that sevoflurane and isoflurane can both be safely used in OPCAB surgery, but the awakening and extubation times are significantly less with sevoflurane.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
 

 

 

 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 
 
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
  *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
 




Department of Anaesthesiology & Critical Care Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi., India

Correspondence Address:
Yatin Mehta
Department of Anaesthesiology & Critical Care, Escorts Heart Institute and Research Centre, Okhla Road, New Delhi 110 025.
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-9784.37924

Rights and Permissions

Maintenance of anaesthesia with volatile anaesthetic agents affects the perioperative course of patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. This facilitates adequate depth of anaesthesia, reduction in need of analgesic dosage, early extubation and transfer from Intensive Care Unit. We compared two volatile anaesthetic agents sevoflurane and isoflurane in terms of haemodynamic effects, amount of analgesic needed during surgery, quantity of agent needed for maintenance of anaesthesia and postoperative recovery in 40 patients undergoing OPCAB surgery. Anaesthesia was induced with fantanyl, midazolam and thiopentone, and vecuronium was used for muscle relaxation. An Octopus stabiliser was used and coronary anastomosis was performed using internal mammary artery and saphenous vein grafts. Routine monitoring was performed. The depth of anaesthesia was monitored using Bispectral index monitor. The inspired/expired concentration of anaesthetic agents to maintain the desired BIS and the amount of volatile anaesthetic agent needed was also noted. The amount of analgesic used intraoperatively was noted in both the groups. The 'time of awakening' defined as eye opening on verbal commands, and time of extubation were noted. There were no differences in haemodynamic parameters, depth of anaesthesia, and quantity of agent needed, but patients in isoflurane group required more intraoperative analgesics than sevoflurane group. Time of awakening (48 13 vs 114 21 mins; P < 0.001) and subsequent extubation (124 25 vs 177 36 mins, P<0.001) was earlier in sevoflurane group than isoflurane group. There was no evidence of perioperative myocardial infarction in both the groups. We conclude that sevoflurane and isoflurane can both be safely used in OPCAB surgery, but the awakening and extubation times are significantly less with sevoflurane.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article