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Antegrade versus antegrade with retrograde delivery of cardioplegic solution in myocardial revascularisation. A clinical study in patients with triple vessel coronary artery disease.


Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
O P Sanjay
Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17827576

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Year : 2003  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 143-8

 

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The effects of antegrade and antegrade with retrograde delivery of cardioplegic solution were evaluated in 60 patients who underwent myocardial revascularisation. All patients had triple vessel coronary artery disease and underwent revascularisation using arterial and vein grafts. Myocardial protection consisted of administration of the St.Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution, topical slushed ice and systemic hypothermia (28 degrees C-30 degrees C). The patients were categorised into: group A (n=30), who received antegrade cardioplegia alone, and group B (n=30), who received antegrade and retrograde cardioplegia. With the exception of the total dose of cardioplegic solution ('p'=0.02), there was no significant difference between the two groups. Cardiac function was assessed before and after the patient was weaned from the cardio-pulmonary bypass. There was a significant increase in the right atrial pressure and a significant decrease in the mean arterial pressure from the baseline ('p'<0.05), 10 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass in group A. All patients in-group B had a spontaneous return to sinus rhythm after release of the aortic cross clamp, whereas 3 patients in group A required defibrillation to restore sinus rhythm. Intra aortic balloon pump support was necessary in 4 patients in group A, as against 1 patient in group B to terminate the cardiopulmonary bypass. The clinical outcome was similar in both groups. We conclude that the use of a combination of retrograde and antegrade cardioplegia facilitates early recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass grafting.






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Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
O P Sanjay
Department of Anaesthesiology and Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, St. John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore, India

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 17827576

Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

The effects of antegrade and antegrade with retrograde delivery of cardioplegic solution were evaluated in 60 patients who underwent myocardial revascularisation. All patients had triple vessel coronary artery disease and underwent revascularisation using arterial and vein grafts. Myocardial protection consisted of administration of the St.Thomas' Hospital cardioplegic solution, topical slushed ice and systemic hypothermia (28 degrees C-30 degrees C). The patients were categorised into: group A (n=30), who received antegrade cardioplegia alone, and group B (n=30), who received antegrade and retrograde cardioplegia. With the exception of the total dose of cardioplegic solution ('p'=0.02), there was no significant difference between the two groups. Cardiac function was assessed before and after the patient was weaned from the cardio-pulmonary bypass. There was a significant increase in the right atrial pressure and a significant decrease in the mean arterial pressure from the baseline ('p'<0.05), 10 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass in group A. All patients in-group B had a spontaneous return to sinus rhythm after release of the aortic cross clamp, whereas 3 patients in group A required defibrillation to restore sinus rhythm. Intra aortic balloon pump support was necessary in 4 patients in group A, as against 1 patient in group B to terminate the cardiopulmonary bypass. The clinical outcome was similar in both groups. We conclude that the use of a combination of retrograde and antegrade cardioplegia facilitates early recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass grafting.






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